DEREK PIROZZI DESIGN WORKSHOP LLC

SARASOTA, FLORIDA

P. 941.716.2745

SCROLL

FOLLY 2015 : CALL FOR PROPOSALS

LOCATION : SOCRATES SCULPTURE PARK, NYC

TYPE : THE ARCHITECTURE LEAGUE OF NY AND SOCRATES SCULPTURE PARK

TEAM:  DEREK PIROZZI AND DAVID ZAWKO

YEAR : 2015

Narcissism, vanity and ego. Today’s society has become saturated with the over obsession of one’s self image an reputation. In a time where a digital identity impersonates our self worth, we have become fixated with our outward public appearance, one that can be so easily observed by a growing international community. Enabled by technology, social media has generated a society of self-portrait addicts under the influence of the habitual need for approval. From seeing a significant increase in the practice of plastic surgery and Botox to the rise of parental praise and sports teams that give every kid a trophy, we have established a cultural delusion in which “feelings of self-worth are considered a prerequisite to success, rather than a result of it.” (Twenge, NY Times) An instant visual communication, the selfie has become the greatest testament of the “me generation,” changing aspects of social interaction, self-awareness and public behavior. The selfie becomes synonymous with the desire to instantly share where we are, who we are (or who we think we are) and what we’re doing. This obsession with ones outward identity has afflicted our modern day culture in ways never seen before.

 

However, self-obsession and fascination with our reflection is nothing new. Throughout human history, various religions and culture address this topic. “In Greek mythology, Narcissus was renowned for his beauty and was exceptionally proud. Nemesis, the god of retribution, noticed this behavior and attracted Narcissus to a pool, where he saw his own reflection in the water and fell in love with it. Unable to leave the beauty of his reflection, Narcissus drowned.” (Graves, The Greek Myths) In Judaism, during the seven day period of Shiva, “worship services are customarily held in the home of the bereaved. Jewish law clearly states that one may not worship an image or stand directly in front of one, whether it be a picture, or a reflected image in a mirror.” (Lamm, Chabad.org) In the Amish culture, humility is regarded as a highly cherished value and view pride as a threat to community harmony. Because items such as personal photographs can accentuate individuality and call attention to one’s self, they are prohibited from the home. Amish believe that photographs in which they can be recognized violate the Biblical commandment, “Thou shalt not make unto thyself a graven image.” They want to be remembered by the lives they lived and the examples they left, not by physical appearance.” (Pennsylvania Dutch Convention & Visitors Bureau)

 

Our 2015 Folly proposal Scroll becomes redolent of a younger generation, increasingly entitled and self-obsessed. Kinetically simple, the continuous reflective surfaces exploit our excessive (sometimes erotic) interest in ones physical appearance. Composed of dynamic flexible mirror panels joined together to create an endless scrolling surface, Scroll becomes activated through the limitless movement of a reflective rolling system. The resulting experience evokes the notion of an endless digital feed of selfies, forcing the user to continually observe their immovable reflection, unaffected by the speed or length of the users scroll. Over time, the highly reflective surface becomes smudged with

the user’s imprint, creating a blurred reflection, distorted by the remaining hand prints of a community. The effected character and appearance becomes synonymous with this folly’s attempt to replace admiration for one’s self with the appreciation for our fellow man.

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